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Kansas City Family Law Blog

Breaking news of a divorce to your child

Missouri parents who have decided to divorce have a lot of worries to handle. One of the top concerns involves parents trying to decide how they're going to break the news to their children. While the options vary depending on the child's age and temperament, there are still some general rules of thumb that can be applied to most situations.

Psychology Today puts a strong emphasis on remaining mature and keeping the child from feeling any blame for the impending divorce. It should be made clear that the divorce is not happening because of them. Rather, it's happening because the parents feel as if it's the best decision, and it's one they made entirely on their own. Additionally, studies have shown that children react better when parents present a unified front. This means parents should avoid blaming each other for the divorce or anything leading up to it.

Should you consider a postnuptial agreement?

27898590_S.jpgFamily law experts in Jackson County will often recommend that you and your spouse enter into a prenuptial agreement prior to your marriage in order to protect each of your existing financial interests should your marriage end. Yet even the experts may agree that not every marriage may need a prenup. Neither of you may have brought significant assets into your marriage, or even if you did, you may have decided that you ultimately did not care how they might be divided should you separate (which likely seemed to be an impossibility at the time). 

Now, for whatever reason, you may be questioning that decision. If so, you should know that postnuptial agreement can be just as good at protecting your assets from being divided or lost in a divorce settlement. A cynic might say that your wanting a postnuptial agreement is a sure sign of you believing that your marriage is already on its way to failing. Yet there are indeed circumstances where considering postnuptial agreement might be the best option for you and your spouse. 

Terminating parental rights in Missouri

43028026_S.jpgAfter your divorce proceedings have been completed in Jackson County, the hope is that you and your now ex-spouse will be able to work together on those ongoing issues which require collaboration (namely, the custody of your kids). Such a task may not be easy, as evidenced by many of those that have worked with us here at the Stange Law Firm eventually seeking to have the parental rights of their former spouses terminated. The law may support your decision if you indeed feel that such a step would be the best option in your case. However, completing such an action can often be difficult. 

Per information shared by Missouri's Judicial Branch, the law allows for the termination of parental rights based on consent. For this to happen, your ex-spouse must agree to it. Even with his or her consent, however, the court must still find that taking such action is in the best interest of your children before approving it. 

License suspensions for child support arrears

87531199_S.jpgOftentimes, married parents in Jackson County might have difficulties supporting themselves and their children. One can only imagine how much more difficult such as task becomes if and when such a couple chooses to divorce. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that as recently as 2015, over $33.7 billion was owed in child support. With such a large sum of money at stake (along with the well-being of those that are owed it), it should come as little surprise that family courts take the issue of child support enforcement so seriously. 

One effective method in resolving child support arrears has been to restrict the privileges of those that owe them. Many states will even suspend the driver's licenses of obligor parents in such situations; Missouri is among them. Per Section 454.1003 of the state's Revised Statutes, one subject to a child support obligation can have his or her driver's license suspended in any of the following situations: 

  • He or she owes an amount in child support arrears equaling either the sum of three months worth of payments or $2500
  • He or she fails to comply with a subpoena from the court concerning the modification of an existing child support order
  • He or she fails to comply with a subpoena from the court concerning the establishment of paternity
  • He or she fails to comply with a subpoena from the court over matters related to genetic testing

What does the tax cut act mean for divorces?

9627606_S.jpgThe president's Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, slated to take effect Dec. 31 of this year, has added a new wrinkle to divorce proceedings in Missouri. Spouses headed for divorce and the attorneys representing them may be already either trying to rush proceedings or slow them down, depending on which one earns more money, according to the American Bar Association.

The ABA explains that the new laws have injected uncertainty into the alimony calculation process and, by extension, the entire divorce process. The new law removes the ability of the payer to deduct alimony checks from his or her annual income, while at the same time eliminating the requirement that the recipient reports them as income. Legal experts expect divorce negotiations to be much more difficult because of it.

Remember to revisit your will after your divorce

25095774_S.jpgAfter your divorce in Jackson County becomes final, you may feel a certain sense of finality. That feeling, however, may be fleeting, as you quickly realize just how much your now ex-spouse was involved in the many different facets of your life. Thus begins the process of removing him or her from the many pertinent personal records he or she might still be found on. Many clients come to us here at the Stange Law Firm asking for assistance in doing this, and one of the documents we remind them to revisit is their wills. The reason for this reminder is that many may often forget to do it. 

If you have created a will in which you now ex-spouse was named as a beneficiary, what happens if you never get around to amending it? Section 461.051 of the Revised Statutes of Missouri states that the moment your divorce is finalized, any provisions naming him or her as a beneficiary are automatically revoked. This law does not apply, however, if you stipulated in the document that said provisions were irrevocable. It is for this reason that you are encouraged to review your will after your divorce even with the aforementioned law in place. 

How do I file for child custody?

14972192_S.jpgIf you are in a situation where you want custody of a child that you currently do not have legal custody of, then you have to go through the Missouri court system to gain those legal rights. According to the Missouri Courts, gaining custody begins by filing a petition with the court. You need to have established paternity and not have a current custody order for the child to file this petition.

Do note that even if you are paying or being paid child support that alone does not establish custody. Custody is a separate legal issue. You can petition for custody even if you are the one paying child support and the child does not currently live with you.

Music producer asked to increase child support payments

40871282_S.jpgVery often, the rewarding if child support payments in a divorce case in Jackson Count is often viewed as a punitive action. In reality, it is not designed to be so. Ex-spouses bickering over the amount of child support required may fail to realize that those amounts are determined by the court and are designed to not impose any unfair financial burdens on either party involved (nor to reward any of those involved for perceived slights they may have suffered). However, the idea of child support as punishment might persist due to the way that people present it. 

A recent case involving a music producer and the mother of his son illustrates this point. The boy's mother approached the father threatening to reveal information about him unless he agreed to increase his child support payments. The man was hesitant to do so for fear that the extra was not meant to benefit his son, but rather the many other children and grandchildren who were also living with the mother. Eventually, the two met through mediation proceedings and were able to come to a compomise that was endorsed by the court. 

Dispute over property leaves results in duo's arrests

39393958_S.jpgIt is often said that there is a thin line between love and hate. Perhaps this explains why so many divorce cases in Jackson County are prone to get messy. People invest a great deal of time, energy and emotion into their marriages, so it may come as little surprise that if and when those relationships fall apart, bitter disputes immediately ensue. All of the positive emotion that one feels for a partner may quickly be pushed over to the other side of the proverbial line, leading to complicated confrontations that can often introduce new complexities into a divorce case. 

This fact was on full display in the case of an Ohio couple. What supposedly started out as a discussion over mutual property quickly devolved into an incident which devolved to the point of requiring police intervention. When law enforcement officials arrived on the scene, the woman involved began to get hostile and soon had to be restrained. Yet as officers were working to obtain her cooperation, the man involved in the dispute suddenly pulled a gun out. While he eventually did surrender the weapon, his hostile behavior continued to the point of officers having to threaten him with the use of pepper spray. 

How is a visitation schedule determined?

38970290_S.jpgAs divorced parents in Missouri, you and your ex-spouse will need to face an issue that other couples may not necessarily need to: child custody. Determining and maintaining child custody arrangements can be a big source of tension after a divorce, and issues related to visitation and child custody rights can often cause trouble for everyone involved. At Stange Law Firm, PC, we work to help you get through any difficulties you may be having regarding child custody.

Whether you have shared or joint custody of a child, or if one parent has sole custody, you will still be operating off of a visitation schedule. This schedule is determined based on a number of factors, including but not limited to parental availability, history of abuse or neglect, status of employment, and ability to provide for the child.

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  • Saint Louis County: 120 S. Central Ave., Suite 450, Clayton, MO 63105: Clayton Office
  • West County: 16024 Manchester Rd., Suite 103, Ellisville, MO 63011: Ellisville Office
  • Jackson County: 256 NE Tudor Rd., Lee's Summit, Missouri 64086: Lee's Summit Office
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  • Franklin County: 5 S. Oak St. Union, MO 63084: Union Office
  • Lincoln County: 20 Centerline Drive, Troy, Missouri 63379: Troy Office
  • Boone County: 1506 Chapel Hill Rd., Suite H, Columbia, MO 65203: Columbia Office
  • Greene County: 901 E. St. Louis, Suite 404, Springfield, Missouri 65806 Springfield, MO Office
  • St. Clair County: 115 Lincoln Place Ct., Ste. 101, Belleville, IL 62221: Belleville Office
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  • Sangamon County: 400 S. 9th St., Suite 100, Springfield, IL 62701: Springfield Office
  • McLean County: 1012 Ekstam Drive, Suite 4, Bloomington, IL 61704: Bloomington Office
  • Johnson County: 7300 West 110th Street, Suite 560, Overland Park, KS 62210: Overland Park Office
  • Sedgwick County: 2024 N. Woodlawn Street, Suite 407, Wichita, Kansas 67208: Wichita Office
  • Monroe County: 116 W. Mill St., Waterloo, IL 62298 (by appt. only): Waterloo Office
  • St. Louis City: 100 S. 4th St., #549, St. Louis, MO 63102 (by appt. only): St. Louis Office
  • Jackson County: 2300 Main St., #948, Kansas City, MO 64108 (by appt. only): Kansas City Office

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